Change that blahblah, Part Dos

I know, I know, you’ve been waiting with bated breath since the last post for the continuation of this series. I won’t make you wait any longer. (I wonder if this “Change that oil every 3000 miles” post will turn into a THREE part series?)

So, let’s start with the generic theme of ‘People with issues’. Like the man at the very beginning and ending of the movie Pretty Woman who says “What’s your sign? Everybody has a sign!”, I think that everybody has at least one issue. Whether or not it turns them into a non-productive part of society is a different story. In any case, I have recently noticed that instead of the younger generations seeming to have major issues, its the older generations that are shocking me with the things they choose to do. Mind you, I am not making a sweeping generalization (gotta love redundancy) about generations, I’m talking about specific people in my extended life. I will give you two examples of what I mean. To make it easier to understand, I will use names, but the names have been changed to protect the semi-innocent, of course.

The first is an older person in my family, who shall be known as “Henrietta”. Henrietta is a mother figure to “Scout”. Scout has another mother figure in her life, “Camilla”. Scout and Camilla get along just fine. Scout truly looks at Henrietta as her mother. Major difference. Henrietta, for some strange reason, feels that Scout likes Camilla more than Scout likes Henrietta. In all honesty, this is not true. Scout respects Camilla, but truly loves Henrietta. So, recently (over the past year or so), Henrietta has “teased” Scout about wanting to be with Camilla more than her, but as time has gone on, the teasing has gotten more and more kind of mean. Scout is in serious emotional dilemma about the whole thing, but over the past few months has gotten a little ticked off about the whole thing. The past few family events that have had both Henrietta and Camilla at Scout’s house, Henrietta has left Scout’s house without saying goodbye. This makes me mad, because it really hurts Scout’s feelings. My take: when we become of octogenarian age we clearly revert to junior high childishness. I hate it because it makes me feel like Henrietta is pulling a “No one is paying attention to me, so I’m going to leave and see if anyone notices.” I don’t want to feel this way about Henrietta, because I really like her, but WTF?

On to example number two: “Odette,” a septuagenarian, and her daughter “Lola”. Lola tries hard to be the friend that Odette wants her to be. Lola, on the other hand, really just wants some respect as an adult from Odette instead of being treated like a teenager (which by the way, she is NOT). Odette likes to give Lola the third degree on everything from what she bought at the grocery store and why to how come you don’t want me to come visit you for three weeks straight. Lola’s biggest complaint about Odette is that Odette always says to her “How many people did you tell before me?” Um, as if that matters? Be freaking happy for Lola, for Pete’s sake, instead of turning every good thing that happens to Lola into a ‘Poor Odette’ thing.

OK, I think I’m done rambling about people with issues, but its nearly 1130 at night right now and I have to get up in an hour or two to nurse the Littlest Peanut. The rest of my blogging will have to wait for Part Tres tomorrow…

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3 responses to “Change that blahblah, Part Dos

  1. Ah, everyone’s favourite blah blah blah me me me family members. Every family’s got 3. They should all be shot. LOL

  2. Poor Lola! If she’s not careful, she could turn into an interrigator.

  3. Pingback: {forking madness over here} » Blog Archive » More septuagenarian woes

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